Consideration of Crystal Clear Bags - Compostability & Biodegradation

Eco Clear Gusset Bags

We are considering Eco Clear Gusset Bags from Crystal Clear Bags Canada, Inc.

https://clearbags.ca/store/products/eco-clear-gusset-bags/

The cellulose film is made by a company called Futamura (they acquired Innovia).

There are a number of film types & a number of different grades of the film; not sure which type & grade the Eco Clear Gusset Bags use?

http://www.futamuragroup.com/divisions/cellulose-films/products/natureflex/

Supposing that they are of the uncoated variety.  It appears that there are 4 different grades, each of which has a Data Sheet available.

http://www.futamuragroup.com/divisions/cellulose-films/products/natureflex/uncoated/


Here are some of the biodegradation & compostability info for the 4 different grades of Uncoated NatureFlex.  They are all highly permeable to water vapour.  For further details, please see the spec sheets, linked to above.

NPF
Biomass Content: 100%
Industrial compostability certified : EN13432, EN14995, ASTM D6400 and ISO 17088
Home compostability: Certified : OK Compost Home
Anaerobic digestion: Approved : ISO 15985
Marine biodegredation: Approved: ASTM D6691-09

NP
Biomass Content: 95%
Industrial compostability certified : EN13432, EN14995, ASTM D6400 and ISO 17088
Home compostability: OK Compost Home
Anaerobic digestion: Approved : ISO 15985
Marine biodegredation: Approved: ASTM D6691-09

NP25
Biomass Content: 95%
Industrial compostability certified : ASTM D6400
Home compostability: Not registered
Anaerobic digestion: Approved : ISO 15985
Marine biodegredation: Approved: ASTM D7801-05

NPU
Biomass Content: 85%
Industrial compostability certified : EN13432, EN14995, ASTM D6400 and ISO 17088
Home compostability: Not Certified
Anaerobic digestion: Not Tested
Marine biodegredation: Not Tested


Some of these grades obtain the OK Compost Home certification, which comes from an outfit called TUV Austria.

http://www.tuv-at.be/home/

http://www.tuv-at.be/tuev-austria-belgium/bioplastics/doc-center/

Following are the parameters of the certification:

http://www.tuv-at.be/fileadmin/user_upload/docs/download-documents/english/Program_OK_02e_d_OK_compost_HOME.pdf


Since our municipality will not accept bioplastics for compost, what I'm interested in is the home compostability aspect.  So, let's see what we can find by looking at the OK Compost Home specification.

There are a number of international standards, as well as other criteria, of which the NatureFlex film must meet in order for it to obtain the OK Compost Home certification.

From what I can tell without further study of the international standards & deciphering of the OK Compost Home spec sheet, it appears that items with the OK Compost Home specification will biodegrade 90% in 12 months between 20 and 30 degrees C in an aerobic environment such as a proper compost heap.


Concerns:

They are highly permeable to water vapour.

They give off greenhouse gas emissions when they biodegrade; methane & CO2.

Some of the grades are not 100% biomass; presumably, the remainder is made from petroleum product.

To meet the ISO standard with regard to anaerobic biodegradation, the test was at 52 degrees & used an anaerobic inoculum of pretreated household waste.  
Source: Bureau of Indian Standards, ISO 15985:2004 https://archive.org/download/gov.in.is.iso.15985.2004/is.iso.15985.2004.pdf

It would be worthwhile discovering whether or not these conditions are present at our local landfill or whether or not these conditions are necessary for biodegredation.


It's too bad that so many of these ISO documents are exorbitantly priced to view!  Seems wrong that something like that isn't freely available...

If anyone would care to fill in any blanks, please do.

 

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